About me

I’ve loved music and history all of my life. I began studying the flute at age nine, and started college at the New England Conservatory in Boston with the intention of becoming a professional flutist. However, after a sudden lurch in a different direction, I somehow ended up with a journalism degree from Antioch College. I’ve worked as a staff reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education and provided editorial assistance for two University of Wisconsin-based editors of professional journals.

I never really outgrew a childhood tendency to inhabit stories. I spent a decade deeply involved in medieval reenactment with the Society for Creative Anachronism. During that time I discovered the pleasures of playing late medieval and early Renaissance music on a variety of early wind instruments: recorders, crumhorns, and shawms.

These days I usually play a portative organ, a Dutch-made replica of a 15th century instrument, along with my husband Tim on recorder. Since the instrument is perpendicular to my body so that I can pump the bellows with my left hand, I play with one hand; that, plus my husband’s line, usually leaves us playing three-part music, with my two lines to his one.

 

I’ve published some short fiction through Callihoo Publishing and in Fickle Muses, and now my first novel, A Thing Done, from Fireship Press. I’m a member of the Historical Novel Society. I blog on topics related to historical fiction, and especially on the research that supports it, at http://historicalfictionresearch.blogspot.com, where you will find much detail on different aspects of life in medieval Florence, ranging from music to politics (as well as a certain amount of whimsy).

My husband and I love to travel to Italy. My historical interests currently center on Dante’s Florence, so we can often be found in Florence or elsewhere in Tuscany, absorbing all the history we can find (which, believe me, is a lot). We live in Madison, Wisconsin, as does my son, an artist and glassblower. We enjoy playing music and surrounding ourselves with native wild plants.